BMAT

BMAT

BMAT

The BioMedical Admissions Test (BMAT) is used by universities around the world to help select applicants for medical, dental, biomedical and veterinary degree programmes.

It tests your ability to apply scientific and mathematical knowledge, as well as problem solving, critical thinking and written communication skills that are essential to university-level study

It covers:
Section 1: Thinking Skills - 60 minutes This element tests generic skills often required for undergraduate study. The range of these, and the approximate balance between them in terms of the number of marks available, is outlined below. Questions are in multiple-choice format. Calculators may not be used.
Section 1 tests you on two areas. Problem Solving and Critical Thinking.

Problem Solving has total 16 questions. This section requires candidates to solve problems, using simple numerical operations.
Problem solving requires the capacity to:

  • Select relevant information
  • Identify similarity
  • Determine and apply appropriate procedure

Critical Thinking has total 32 question. This section presents a series of logical arguments and requires respondents to:

  • Summarise conclusions
  • Draw conclusions
  • Identify assumptions
  • Assess the impact of additional evidence
  • Detect reasoning errors
  • Match arguments
  • Apply principles


Section 2: Scientific Knowledge and Applications – 30 minutes Section 2 tests whether candidates have an appropriate level of core scientific knowledge and the ability to apply it. Questions will be restricted to material typically included in non-specialist Science and Mathematics courses in secondary education. The balance between the subject areas in terms of time and marks available is outlined below. Questions will be in multiple-choice format. Calculators may not be used.

Speed as well as accuracy is important in this section. There are no penalties for incorrect responses, only marks for correct answers, so candidates should attempt all 27 questions. Each question is worth one mark.

Total Questions are : 27
Biology : 7
Chemistry : 7
Physics : 7
Mathematics : 6


Section 3: Writing Task 30 minutes A selection of three tasks will be available, from which one must be chosen. These will include brief questions based on topics of general, scientific or medical interest. Questions will provide a short proposition and may require candidates to consider one of the following tasks.

  1. Explanation of the proposition: candidates are asked to explain the proposition or part of it, or its implications.
  2. Generation of a counter-argument: candidates are asked to look at the other side of the argument by proposing or commenting on a counter-argument or counter-proposition.
  3. Reconciliation of the two sides: candidates are asked to offer some sort of resolution or reconciliation for two opposing positions (or elements of those positions) explored in the answer.
The Writing Task provides an opportunity for candidates to demonstrate the capacity to consider different aspects of a proposition, and to communicate them effectively in writing. Whilst candidates may make preliminary notes, answers are strictly limited to one A4 page, to promote the disciplined selection and organisation of ideas, together with their concise, accurate and effective expression. Dictionaries or electronic spell-checkers are not permitted. 5 When scoring responses, consideration will be given to the degree to which candidates have: addressed the question in the way demanded; organised their thoughts clearly; expressed themselves using concise, compelling and correct English; used their general knowledge and opinions appropriately. Admitting institutions will be provided with a copy of the candidate’s response.

Test format

There will be separate question papers for each of Sections 1, 2 and 3. With the exception of the Writing Task (Section 3), all questions are in multiple-choice format. Each multiple-choice question is worth one mark. Scoring and reporting For both Thinking Skills (Section 1) and Scientific Knowledge and Applications (Section 2), answer sheets are scanned and verified, followed by automated marking, psychometric analysis, test calibration and the issuing of results. For Sections 1 and 2, scores will be reported (to one decimal place) on a 9-point BMAT scale. The Writing Task (Section 3) is marked by Cambridge Assessment Admissions Testing examiners. Scores are reported for the quality of content on a scale from 1 to 5, and for the quality of English on a scale from A to E. An image of the response will be supplied to each institution to which the candidate has applied. In addition to the scores, the task provides the institution with a basis for qualitative assessments of writing skills.

Scoring and reporting

For both Thinking Skills (Section 1) and Scientific Knowledge and Applications (Section 2), answer sheets are scanned and verified, followed by automated marking, psychometric analysis, test calibration and the issuing of results. For Sections 1 and 2, scores will be reported (to one decimal place) on a 9-point BMAT scale. The Writing Task (Section 3) is marked by Cambridge Assessment Admissions Testing examiners. Scores are reported for the quality of content on a scale from 1 to 5, and for the quality of English on a scale from A to E. An image of the response will be supplied to each institution to which the candidate has applied. In addition to the scores, the task provides the institution with a basis for qualitative assessments of writing skills.

(Information source : https://www.admissionstesting.org/for-test-takers/bmat/preparing-for-bmat/)


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Course Features

  • No of Sessions 14
  • No of hours 28
  • Content Yes
  • No of students 5 per classroom batch
    3 for online batch
Address

Suite 9, Neals Corner
2 Bath Road,
Hounslow, TW3 3HJ

Available Batches